Matthew Dowd Gets Very Defensive About Deleted Tweets

Matthew Dowd Gets Very Defensive About Deleted Tweets

As we said on our podcast last week, Driftglass and I, were we Texas voters, would definitely vote for Matthew Dowd for Lieutenant Governor of Texas if he got the nomination.

We hope he doesn’t get the nomination.

Matthew Dowd is not your friend. He was chief strategist for the Bush-Cheney 2004 presidential campaign.

Let me repeat that. He was chief strategist for the Bush-Cheney 2004 presidential campaign.

And the opinions expressed by him on Twitter in 2015-16, “end the corrupt duopoly and vote independent” helped elect Trump. That’s just a fact.

Now, anyone can admit they were wrong, change parties (and yes, kudos to Dowd for running as a Democrat), and really truly earn the support of progressives in any race, let alone Texas Lieutenant Governor. Again, if he’s the nominee, go Matthew.

Has Dowd admitted he was wrong, though, or just erased his past? He’s deleted most of his tweets from before this year. And that’s a problem.

He got very defensive with Brianna Keilar this morning, claiming that asking the question “why did you delete your entire Twitter history” is somehow doing the work of Fox News.

“You must support me as the enemy of your enemy” doesn’t cut it here, Matt.

Because memory is the liberal superpower. And as my better half embedded many of your old tweets at his blog, it turns out the words you tweeted are there forever.

I have worked in both parties. There is no improving them from within. Need to disrupt from without.

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) August 7, 2016

so do I. We just have to disrupt the rigging going on. Need ubers in politics and governance.

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) August 11, 2016

@RavMABAY i am optimistic. Trump can easily be an accelerator to disrupt our current corrupt political system. end the duopoly.

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) December 10, 2015

Join me in putting country over party. For independent minded leadership And if you are sick of the party duopoly. https://t.co/v1sLCEhGTX

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) November 10, 2016

Our constitutional democratic republic is strong enough to withstand any President; it isn’t strong enough to withstand continued duopoly.

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) September 16, 2016

As we move towards the party conventions, the two broken major parties are about to each nominate unelectable candidates. Wow. Duopoly.

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) July 13, 2016

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) September 10, 2016

I am a common sense conservative who thinks DC and the duopoly party control is sadly broken and can’t be trusted.

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) June 18, 2016

I have picked a side. America. And independence from a broken duopoly. Why don’t you try not to be a sheep

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) November 2, 2016

i think about my family/my country all the time.I am not going to be forced by the duopoly to vote for someone i don’t trust

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) October 24, 2016

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) August 13, 2016

@GovGaryJohnson every time someone says it is a binary choice, I say that is duopoly defending status quo.

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) August 9, 2016

stop. That is what duopoly says to preserve status quo.

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) August 7, 2016

— Matthew Dowd (@matthewjdowd) March 8, 2016

You are going to have to do better than “asked and answered” Mister Dowd. That worked with Bush’s drug and drink problem in 2004. It doesn’t work today.

There are consequences for, instead of admitting you were terribly wrong and Hillary Clinton should be president, deleting your own past and pretending anyone bringing that up is helping the enemy.

You helped the enemy, Matthew. There was no “corrupt duopoly,” there was just you, using your blue check to move voters to a third party candidate and asking readers to see Donald J. Trump as an “accelerator” of righteous “disruption.”

We see you. Good luck at the primary debates.

Driftglass contributed to this post.

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